Why Use BBCOR Baseball Bats In Baseball?

using-bbcor-baseball-batUsing BBCOR baseball bats may mark the difference between commendable performance and a bad one. When gaming gets stressful-namely, causes friends to start loosing confidence in you and your self-esteem gets compromised-it is high time to take proactive measures needed to win your games and have more fun.

BBCOR is the initial for Batted Ball Coefficient of Restitution. This is the new model of bat regulation testing which also operates on the principle of measuring up all non-wood bats to see to it that they closely simulate the wood bats. Don’t be left behind in tapping into the numerous pleasant advantages that come with using the BBCOR baseball bats in your gaming activities.

One noticeable difference with the BBCOR test lies in the fact that it has the ability to measure the ball exit speeds after the bats have been broken in. That is the main reason as to why the ABI (Accelerated Break-In Test) works in unison with BBCOR. The ABI test usually comes handy when it comes to those bats that simulate heavy use. The more the composite bats get used, the better their performance becomes. It might interest you to learn that ABI can make it possible for all bats to perform similar to wood bats even in those cases of heavy usage.

BBCOR baseball bats are generally about upholding the player safety at the forefront and it is up to you as a player and the coaches to see to it that the integrity of the game is upheld. A lot has been going on in the baseball gaming landscape and some people are finding themselves lost in the ever changing intricacies associated with the gaming and the regulations as well. It is not advisable to have yourself left behind in the dynamics of baseball gaming. Long gone are the days when the aluminum bat ‘ping’ was the order of the day and it is crucial to open your eyes to see and take advantage of the power-laden bats-BBCOR baseball bats.

Most of the well-established players that have been using the BBCOR baseball bats for a while now are attesting to the fact that the bats are bringing back the game to the way it was originally tailored to play. Let’s get the facts straight. The BBCOR baseball bats are about emphasizing on defense and pitching as well.

Furthermore, it is about executing the little plays of gaming contrary to the way some people move about it-staying put for the three run homer. BBCOR bat rules adjustments is the way forward to fun play and progress in baseball gaming success.

It is important to take advantage of the BBCOR bats as a player that looks forward to great gaming success. It is important in the sense that it helps you become an accomplished and successful player because of its associated attributes. You feel good taking home wins after every game.

Using ineffective bats in the field has affected the overall performance of a lot of players because it holds them back from controlling the ball appropriately. When you choose the best BBCOR baseball bats certified, you go against all those factors that pull you back from attaining success when using the inappropriate bats. Success becomes guaranteed for you.

The Best Womens Rear Entry Snowboard Bindings – Top 4 Recommended

You might have wondered how women head to snowboarding in winter with no difficulty. Snowboarding is a breathtaking winter sport, played in the United States of America, where snowboard gear kick starts the riders with snowboarding.

Specialized gears and accessories are designed for this sport, in which men and women share different accessories separately. Over the period of time, the popularity of this sport has bestowed a new style statement to its accessories and gears. As a result, the best womens rear entry snowboard bindings are lately much in vogue among women.

womens-rear-entry-snowboard-bindings

In snowboarding, the snowboard binding is the one who plays the most integral role in riding and moving the riders from one direction to another, maintaining their body steadiness. The sport is simply exhilarating to play, in which the riders can descend from a higher snow capped slopes to a lower slope riding through the snow fields, while standing on the snowboard attached to the rider’s feet with snowboard bindings.
Usefulness of Snowboard Bindings

The best thing is that women can adapt various snowboarding styles on the mountain using the snowboard bindings. You can jump, spin and can even try out exciting aerial moves with high flexibility and ease. No matter whether you are riding for the first time or trying to explore new riding tricks, the women rear entry snowboard bindings will certainly boost up your vitality and take you ahead to the next level of snowboarding.

While snowboarding, the bindings are connected with the snowboard that helps in transferring the muscle strength to the board. The more perfect snowboard bindings you use, the more comfortable and joyous your riding experience will be.

So, now if this exciting sport won over your heart and mind, then a quick review on the best women’s rear entry snowboard bindings will impart adequate knowledge about the product, which may interest you to attempt this sport.

Lately, the sports stores are catering a plenty of snowboard bindings to choose from. But,going online to buy snowboard bindings is what I in my opinion prefer to recommend.

Buying products online will save you a certain amount of money as well as you can end up choosing your best gears from the pool of accessories. So, a better review on the top four women’s rear entry snowboard bindings would do the best and prove valuable for your purpose.

Top 4 Best Women’s Rear Entry Snowboard Bindings

GNU B-Free Snowboard Bindings Womens

The GNU B-Free Snowboard Bindings Womens is just the comfortable and relaxing snowboarding bindings you could ever get. You can perform better riding with this snowboard binding, as it has quick straps that bind your feet with the snowboard strongly.

It is designed with cool middle ground flex that comforts all riders and is super adjustable where you can conveniently dial out the bindings, making the best fit possible. Further, with its fit-toe response and tip-trail response, you can avoid contact with board often and feel a comfortable underfoot. In addition to this, you can cherish a classy look with its other features like Ft-5 Highback, Ft-2 Baseplate, Comprex Ankle Strap, thin fit-toe strap and EVA foam footbed.

Burton Escapade Snowboard Bindings Natural White Womens

If you are high on fashion, the Burton Escapade Snowboard Bindings Natural White Womens is the ultimate one you can purchase. Apart from being highly fashionable, comfy and speedy, this snowboard binding has stiff flex, but ensures high performance.

Its design is specifically made for women with true-fit design with dual component canted living hinge real mesh HI Back, dual component smooth glide buckles, new cored ultrastrap air and ultra capstrap, and baseplate made with 30% short-glass or nylon composite.

With its enormous features and functions, this snowboard binding is made to complement any snowboard and further enables the rider to jump, spin and move freely.

Flow Gem Snowboard Binding – Women’s

The Flow Gem Snowboard Binding – Women’s is yet another snowboard binding that prepares you for another breathtaking adventure on the snowfield. This is a performance driven product, which is comfortable and ensures high convenience while turning, skipping and making aerial moves.

It is sleek, trendy, yet durable that lasts long. With its reclining hiback and wider molded H-series rockered baseplate, you can overlook the presence of the snowboard underneath your feet. Full-EVA Toe&Heel-Inserts, 1 piece uniback ventilated hiback, 1 piece Exo-fit PowerStrap with LSR-Buckles and Combi –disk for 4X4 and 3HP mounting are included with its features.

Siren Mystic Women’s 2016 Snowboard Bindings

Finally, the very striking and relaxed snowboard binding for women is here. The Siren Mystic Women’s 2016 Snowboard Bindings is amazing in its trendy white and blue looks. It has a gel padded ankle and toe design strap that gives quick response and comfort while descending down from the slope. Its popularity also lies in its free rides which enable full 360 degree rotation and quick aerial movements. It is high on comfort as well with full EVA padded thick back.

Fitting women boot sizes ranging from 6-11, this snowboard binding is an ideal blend of fashion, comfort and convenience, where its baseplate is covered with super padded EVA foam that not only support you in your jumps and moves, but also ensure optimal comfort during the course of action. It is designed technically and emerged as a safe binding for women to ride on.

Conclusion

At the end of our talk, we can gladly conclude the best womens rear entry snowboard bindings are the matchless option when you head to snowboarding in winter. These snowboarding gears will go the furthest peak to make your snowboarding experience more exhilarating and unforgettable. So, speed up your enthusiasm and go online to get yourself a cool and best snowboard bindings to embark on an adventurous snowboarding this year.

What Is The Senior Softball Bat?

Do you want to buy a senior softball bat? Senior softball bats have different designs and sizes. Their barrels measure at least two and a quarter inches in diameter. When choosing the right senior softball bat to buy, you should keep in mind the following guidelines.

They Are:

1) Weight

senior-softball-bats-balance

Image: basesloadedsportsllc.com

Senior softball bats come in different weights. Heavy softball bats give you more hitting power but tend to have slower swing speeds as a result of their weight. You should choose a softball bat with a weight that you can handle well. For example, choose a lighter softball bat if you want faster swings or a heavier bat if you are a heavy hitter.

2) Barrel Length

Softball bats come in different lengths that vary from twelve to fourteen inches. You should look for a softball bat with a length that suits your playing needs. For example, choose longer lengths if you are a speed hitter and shorter ones if you happen to be a strong hitter. You should also test a bat with a few swings before buying. That helps you to have a feel of its power.

3) Material

Another factor to consider when buying bats is the manufacturing material. Typical materials are aluminum, composite, wood and alloy. You should keep in mind that composite bats are best for you although they break down quickly and are expensive.

When choosing wood bats, bamboo sticks are the best for you as they are robust and durable. You should also consider maple bats if you happen to be a big hitting batter. That’s because they are stiff and can withstand force.
Aluminum or alloy bats are best for you if you want a lightweight and durable bat. Alloy bats are made of carbon fiber that can sting your hands if not properly handled.

4) Approval

Softball leagues have their different certifications when it comes to softball bat standards. You should check with your league rules to ensure that your bat meets their standard requirements.

You should also be careful when buying used senior softball bats as they may be damaged. You can check your league association websites to find out about their bat rules.

5) One Piece and Two Piece Bats

Softball bats come in two different makes. One-piece bats are constructed using one piece of metal from the barrel to the handle. That enables you to have a powerful swing as there is little flex as you hit the ball. One-piece bats are ideal for you if you happen to be a powerful hitter.

The downside to them is that they give a lot of vibration as compared to the two-piece softball bats. Two piece bats, on the other hand, have their barrels and handles bonded together.

You will find them more flexible as they have a whip effect that enhances your bat speed. It’s ideal for you as a contact hitter.

6) Balanced and End Loaded Bats

Another point to consider is the overall stability of your bat. End loaded softball bats have slight imbalances as a result of their barrels that have extra weight. That enables you to have powerful and faster swing. However, you need to be patient when using this end loaded softball bats.

That’s because you need time to figure out your ideal swinging angle. Balanced bats, on the other hand, have their weights evenly distributed. They enable you to enjoy a smooth swing without having to put in a lot of strength. Your swinging angle is also easier as these bats have a balanced load. You can learn clearly about them at kandkadventures.com

Conclusion

Choosing the right senior softball bat should be easier if you follow the above guidelines. Your choice of senior softball bat material will also determine its price.

How to Determine Slowpitch and Fastpitch Softball Glove Size

Choosing the right glove is not as random as it may sound. It is just like choosing the right tool for the right job. An ideal glove to a player is one that fits both the players hands and best suites the players position.

The output quality of the task in hand depends on your ability to determine the right equipment. For comfort and convenience in using a glove, determining the glove that suits your need is the first item on the checklist. So, what goes into determining the right glove?

Fastpitch and Slowpitch gloves – What’s The Difference?

While the difference between a fastpitch and a slowpitch glove is small, this difference can be significant enough to someone who knows what they are looking for. A fast pitch softball player, example at college level, will need a glove significantly different from a minor league slowpitch player.

fastpitch-slowpitch-glove-between

Image: coachrynders.com

In a slowpitch game, a catcher’s mitt is not that necessary. An essential Utility Mitt will do just fine. The same does not apply to a fastpitch catcher. Pitches in fastpitch travel at 90mph on average so a catcher will need a catcher’s mitt and extra padding, just like those used by baseball players. Other factors include the player’s field position.

Shortstops and second basemen will need gloves with shallow pockets to allow them to get the ball out of the pocket faster while outfield players will need deeper pockets to make easier catches. The material used in making the gloves and the webbing applied will also determine what kind of pitching the glove is designed to catch.

Determining the Glove Size

A combination of two key factors will determine what a player needs. These are a player’s age and the field position. The size increases with age up until high school level when an adult will use the same size of glove as a high school student.

In knowing the size of glove, use a measuring tape and measure from the index pocket to the heel at the base of the glove. The following are the ideal glove sizes based on age and player position.

Fastpitch

An infield player under the age of 8 will wear a 9-inch to an 11-inch glove, while an outfield player will need a glove between 10.5 inches and 11.5 inches in size. For ages 9 to 13, an infield player will need a 10-inch to 11-inch glove while an outfield player will wear an 11 or 11.5-inch glove.

A high school student’s glove is ideal between 11.5 inches and 12.5 inches for an infield player and 12.5 inches to 13 inches for an outfield player.

Slowpitch

Slowpitch gloves are unspecified since not much detailing goes into the design for manufacture. An infield player will find a 12 inch or 13-inch ideal while an outfield player’s glove is between 12 and a half inches and 14 inches in size.

The allowance in size is to accommodate the smaller than or larger-than-normal players, but most manufacturers provide a measuring chart that details the right size of glove for both fastpitch and slowpitch players. The glove size gradually increases from the first base through to the third base players, pitches, and outfield players.

Finally

Choosing a glove that fits your hand not only makes playing fun, but it is also fundamental to prevent injury that may be brought about by wearing an undersized or oversized glove.

When shopping for a softball glove keep in mind you need to consider field position, level of play and the age of the player. These three factors should be a guidance to purchasing a glove that fits well and is designed for the position one plays. Remember the secret to success as a softball player lies in the ability to maintain control of the ball around the gloves.

Lakewood Police seek hit and run driver; victim severely injured

LAKEWOOD – Police are seeking a hit and run driver who left a 45-year-old pedestrian in the street injured and unable to escape being hit by a second car in the eastbound lanes of West Colfax Avenue late Saturday.

The driver of the second car was stopped and arrested by police a short distance from the scene of the accident at the intersection of West Colfax and Kendall Street.

Investigators said the victim, whose identity is being withheld until his family can be notified, sustained potentially life-threatening injuries. He was taken to St. Anthony Central Hospital for treatment.

Lakewood Police investigators said the victim was crossing Colfax heading south about 10:55 p.m. Saturday when the first vehicle hit him and kept going east on Colfax. That vehicle is described as a silver-color, recent model sedan. After the first vehicle struck the victim, police said, a car they believe was driven by Martin Parras, 44, also struck the victim, then continued a short distance eastbound on Colfax.

After his arrest, Parras was booked into the Jefferson County Jail on suspicion of vehicular assault and driving under the influence. He no longer was in jail Monday morning, according to jail records.

Lakewood Police urge anyone who witnessed the accident or anyone with information about the accident or the other driver and vehicle to contact investigators at 303-987-7111.

OPED: GSA’s actions contradict its “green” message

The U.S. General Service Administration (GSA) states they want to “increase conservation awareness, save natural resources, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

I challenge GSA to live up to their words by setting aside natural habitat on the Denver Federal Center as identified on their final master site plan. Conservation awareness is not possible without including natural habitat and wildlife. Education includes teaching reverence and respect for our natural environment, which GSA seems to have all but forgotten.

Natural resources such as land, water, and wildlife are not renewable.

If GSA wants to influence more sustainable behavior, then they should practice what they preach. Stop exterminating wildlife simply to make way for your “green development”. There is nothing “green” about extermination.

GSA has also stated they have “embarked on a bold goal of achieving zero environmental footprint”.

Rapid development is destroying the environment, leaving a huge footprint from which it cannot recover. The lack of foresight to plan for natural habitat and wildlife, which can be sustained for future generations, is arrogant and foolish.

In addition, GSA states they want to be a “good neighbor” and help us “green our environment together”.

GSA has the opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to the local sustainability movement by setting aside natural habitat at the Denver Federal Center. Natural habitat helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions by pumping oxygen into the air. If GSA is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, then they must make it a priority to save natural habitat.

Perhaps GSA can consult with Noble Prize winner Susan Solomon, Ph.D., Senior Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Boulder about how the loss of habitat locally and globally is negatively impacting the world’s environment.

The best way for GSA to effect change is to lead by example.

It is time GSA takes responsibility for including true conservation awareness, the retention of natural resources, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by incorporating natural habit and wildlife within the Denver Federal Center.

If you value natural habitat and wildlife and want them to remain on the Denver Federal Center for the next 100 years please contact: GSA: Sally Mayberry, Public Affairs Officer Denver Federal Center 240 Denver, Co. 80225-0000 Phone:(303) 236-8000 x2322; Fax: (303) 236-3606; Cell: (303) 941-7637; Blackberry Pin: 30E2ADC6; Email: sally.mayberry@gsa.gov; or Lakewood Mayor Bob Murphy: 303-987-7040; bmurphy@lakewood.org

Cultural Center adds second Chinese dance performace

SUBMITTED BY: Rhetta Shead, Marketing & Promotions Supervisor, Lakewood Cultural Center

LAKEWOOD – The Lakewood Cultural Center announces the addition of second performance by one of China’s premier dancers, Yu Wei, on Saturday, Jan. 22 at 7:30 p.m. for Yu Wei: Chinese Dance Collection, a visually stunning multimedia performance of Chinese culture and history shown through rich cinematography and dance.

Limited tickets also are available for the 2 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 23, performance. All tickets are $18 for adults and are available by calling 303-987-7845, online at www.Lakewood.org/CulturalCenter or at the Cultural Center Box Office, 470 S. Allison Parkway (near Wadsworth Boulevard and West Alameda Avenue). Senior, student, child and group discounts are available and there will be ample, free on-site parking.

With a cultural richness and unique style, Yu Wei’s dance art is inspired both by nature and the human condition. The program features music from China and the world, original costumes and hairdressings and short films shown between the dances that depict the culture and artistic background of both dance and dancer.

Yu Wei’s captivating dance visions have been holding American audiences spellbound for over a decade. She has been praised for being a “special artist and a gifted, sensitive dancer” and “a brilliant dance star.” Loved by audiences everywhere, Yu Wei has performed throughout the United States including New York’s Manhattan Center and the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington D.C.

As a little girl, Yu Wei was selected by the Wuhan Song and Dance Theater Academy to study a broad curriculum of dance based on Chinese classical, traditional and folk dance and ballet. After graduating, she joined the Wuhan Company and soon became its principal dancer.

After relocating to Beijing, Yu Wei began her long collaboration with nationally renowned dance master Zhang Ke. She was the lead dancer of the National Ballets Lijiang River Sentiment and Yao Shan Flame. Her Chinese Dance Collection has been performed in all of China’s major cities and broadcast on National Century Television.

Performed in America since 2000, the Yu Wei Dance Collection has been selected for the rosters of Philadelphia’s Musicopia and the Pennsylvania Performing Arts on Tour (PennPAT).

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Anette John-Hall wrote: “Such a beautiful dancer. There are strains of ballet, folk and modern dance throughout her program – she is adept at them all. With her disproportionately long hands that flutter like a bird, Yu Wei’s dancing is all fluidity and grace.”

After viewing her performance at the 2004 Philadelphia Fringe Festival, dance critic Merilyn Jackson of the Philadelphia Inquirer wrote: “Yu Wei took everyone’s breath away with her dance Lotus – Burst of Pure Dream. Lying on her back with her head to the audience, she depicted how a lotus unfolds. It was pure beauty.”

The Lakewood Cultural Center 2010-2011 Performing Arts Season is generously supported by the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD), with appreciation to the citizens of the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District, Aura Spa and Wellness Center at the Sheraton Denver West and The Denver Post.

Censure of school board member ignites heated debate

LAKEWOOD – The Jefferson County School Board Thursday got an earful from supporters of embattled board member Laura Boggs, who was the target of a censure approved by her fellow school trustees last month.

In censuring the conservative Boggs, board member Robin Johnson said, despite a board vote to the contrary, Boggs spoke in support of three statewide ballot issues, 60, 61 and 101, which would have restored voter approved statewide tax and spending limits, reduced some fees and the state’s income tax and limited government debt. The board voted to oppose all three of the 2010 ballot issues.

Boggs’ public support of the ballot issues, Johnson said, went against the board’s “governance” policy, which requires members speak with a single voice once a vote has been taken. Other board members cited Bogg’s behavior in school settings, saying she acted inappropriately.

But the catalyst for the censure was a memo to board members from Superintendent Cindy Stevenson that said Boggs had threatened to raise questions about a federal grant to gauge the effectiveness of linking incentive-based pay raises with student achievement. In the memo, Stevenson said she felt intimidated when Boggs said she would “tear this county apart.”

State Rep. Jim Kerr, a Republican who represents the heavily populated House District 28 in South Jeffco said Boggs was “censured unreasonably” in what “amounts to an attempt to limit the First Amendment rights of an elected official who is expressing an opinion.”

“The voices of all of you need to be heard,” Kerr said. “I want my elected official to be able to voice their opinion. By taking that away, you are depriving a member of this board of her freedom of speech.”

After the 4-0 vote to censure Boggs came down Dec. 16, board member Paula Noonan called for Boggs’ exclusion from any school board committee.

During a late afternoon study session before Thursday’s board meeting, Noonan rescinded that proposal, saying she wanted to set a new tone for the New Year.

During a break between the two meetings, Noonan approached reporters to endorse Boggs’ right to voice her opinions despite previous charges that Boggs violated the board’s governance policy.

“Anybody can say whatever they want whenever and where ever they want,” Noonan said.

Other citizens opposed to the censure raised issues of school performance in their support of Boggs’ opinions on linking the rising cost of education to student assessment scores.

Jen Raiffie, with a group of Boggs’ supporters standing behind her, said the district spends $11,000 per student each year, but some schools post proficiency rates as low as 10 percent.

“I am disturbed by the transgressions of this board,” Raiffie said. “This board is not putting students where they should, and that’s first.”

And Brenda Smull, backed by another group of Boggs’ supporters, echoed that concern.

“Why are we paying more for less,” Smull asked.

Board members did not comment on the support for Boggs, but a group of teachers stood in defense of the censure, and a Jefferson County Teachers Association officer defended the JCEA, which took some collateral criticism during the meeting.

“We do have a lot of work to do. We have also accomplished a lot,” said Lisa Elliott of the JCEA, referring to the comments about low proficiency rates. “(But) It seems today that, much of the time, when a student doesn’t do well, the teacher or the school or the principal or the school board is in trouble, not the kid.”

And David Rupert, speaking for the group of teachers, hinted Boggs had the wrong motives when she questioned the federal incentive grant.

“Too often in today’s winner-take-all climate, true collaboration and mutual respect are replaced by dishonesty and manipulation generated by a politician who is attempting to further his or her political agenda,” Rupert said. “When true collaboration does occur, as it has in this case, it can be twisted and used for political posturing or an opportunity to spout one’s ideology.”

But Lakewood activist Sherry Collins questioned the role Bogg’s behavior played in the censure.

“This seems to be about two things: process and behavior. And you will recall, you had a former Board member that beat his wife and daughter,” Collins said, referring to former school board member Vince Chowdry. “You didn’t censure his behavior, which was worse than the political dissent and supposed behavior of Mrs. Boggs.”

Jeffco youngsters take radon awareness message to another level

LAKEWOOD – A pair of Jeffco youngsters have a message: Radon can kill.

Christina and Eric Bear have launched RAP-Detect to Protect, a radon awareness program (RAP) urging use of inexpensive, in-home radon detection kits and other measures to mitigate risks.

And they are taking their message to city councils, community events and, soon, to schools, YouTube and the state legislature in hopes of alerting their young peers, teachers and public officials of the need to stem the intrusion of the silent killer.

Lakewood City Council is next on their list. Christina and Eric plan to address Council at its Jan. 10 meeting, and hope to persuade council members to enact an International Building Code provision that would require radon mitigation in newly built homes and other buildings, perhaps even extending the mitigation requirements to renovations.

“We have a grass-roots strategy that we’re working with,” said Christina, 12. “We start at the bottom with teachers and kids,” who spread the word to parents, grandparents, neighbors and others.

“And we’re also speaking at City Council meetings where we can ask them what they’re doing and ask them what we can do to help them and what they can do to help us,” said Eric, who is two years younger.

Radon is a naturally occurring, invisible radioactive gas emitted from uranium and radium in the soil. It can be drawn into a building – a process hastened by some heating systems – where it accumulates to levels that increase the likelihood of lung cancer, especially among people who spend decades in an affected home.

They adopted radon awareness as their cause a few years back while looking for something to occupy their time during a break from school and found a national radon poster contest. As they researched the topic, Christina and Eric became alarmed about the looming presence of radon, which occurs at high levels in the soil across Colorado.

“We know that Colorado is one of the states that has the most radon in the United States,” Eric said.

“It really surprised us that so many people were dying from this gas that you can’t taste, feel or anything like that, and we just wanted to spread awareness about it,” Christina said during an interview at the Jefferson County Department of Health offices in Lakewood.

Jim Dale, epidemiologist for the county agency, said a “broad estimate” based on national figures and bolstered the elevated radon risk in the state suggests 400 radon-caused lung cancers deaths occur each year in Colorado. Based on population assumptions, Dale estimates that 40 of those deaths occur in Jefferson County.

Christina won the national poster contest in 2008 and Eric won the contest in 2010.

With those credentials in their favor, they decided to take their radon detection and mitigation message to the community.

“We were like: We really need to do something about this,” Eric said. “We think it is a really good idea to spread awareness and help people know that there is this stuff out there and we need to fix it.”

Among the fixes: Appendix F of the International Building Code, which suggests several mitigation measures for new construction. The IBC urges such things as polyethylene sheeting beneath crawl spaces, a 3- to 4-inch vent pipe from below grade to the roof that can be modified to accommodate a vent fan where needed and sealed basement joints and the areas where pipes enter structures.

Such measures would cost between $350 and $500, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

And for existing buildings, Eric and Christina to use radon detection kits available from a variety of sources, including Jeffco Health and home improvement stores.

Because radon is contained in soils, basements and ground-floor areas harbor the highest risk for radon exposure.

But homes aren’t the only problem, especially for school children.

“One of the reasons we want to spread awareness is that kids spend most of their time at home or at school and we thought that if one of those has a high radon level then that’s dangerous,” Christina said.

Because schools can pose a risk, she and Eric want to take their presentation to schools, as well, partly because schools are not required to mitigate the intrusion of radon into schools, something both youngsters plan to change.

“Our goal is to spread awareness. Then further down the road, get some laws passed to get it mitigated” in schools as well, Eric said.

When they start lobbying the legislature, the siblings will have plenty of support.

They have enlisted the Colorado Department of Public Health of Environment, the EPA, the American Lung Association and Jeffco’s Health Department in their awareness campaign.

And Jeffco Health spokeswoman Nancy Braden plans to help Eric and Christina compile a YouTube video presentation they can use in their awareness campaign. Braden had high praise for the youngsters.

“Most of us don’t start thinking about medical issues until we are older,” Braden said. “What could be more important in our lives?”

Mayor points to city’s financial health, public safety in year end report

LAKEWOOD – The city fared well during 2010, escaping many of the financial problems that face many of the city’s neighbors, and 2011 offers some promising developments, Mayor Bob Murphy said in his annual Year’s End Report.

“It is time to celebrate accomplishments … some of the things that we accomplished in the City of Lakewood this year,” Murphy told City Council Monday night during the last Council meeting of the year.

Murphy gave credit for the bright outlook to “this council, everybody that works for the City of Lakewood – each and every one of our staff members – and our community, as well, the very, very engaged and active citizenry.”

While most governments in Colorado as well as nation wide are struggling to make ends meet by cutting back on staff, services and other expenses Lakewood has thus far avoided crippling budget problems, adding to the city’s reserve fund for the fourth consecutive year without layoffs or cutbacks in city-provided services, Murphy said.

That came about while the city entered its first full without its long-standing grocery tax, which was eliminated by City Council in response to findings by a city-appointed review panel and a citizen-initiated petition drive that would have sent the matter to a special election.

Among other good news: the city’s crime rate is down for the third consecutive year

“Our fundamental role is keeping Lakewood safe,” Murphy said, praising the Lakewood Police Department as “the best in the state” and acknowledging the role of a vigilant community in safeguarding public safety.

The city also took a large step forward on the issue of government transparency at the beginning of the year, launching The Lakewood Ledger, a searchable online database of the city’s checkbook.

“You can go online and track every single nickel of Lakewood’s revenue and expenses,” Murphy said.

Murphy also noted the city’s role in saving O’Connell Middle School in east-central Lakewood after the school was placed on a Jeffco Public Schools hit-list of facilities to be closed in a money saving measure.

The city lobbied the county school board to spare the school, which serves an economically challenged area of the community. As part of the argument to spare the school, the city revealed plans to launch a Boys and Girls Club at the school, then helped raise the funds to ensure the youth organization could meet its funding goal.

And the city launched a number of small-business initiatives during the year, part of the effort to demonstrate Lakewood is a “small business friendly” community, Murphy said.

Among other 2010 accomplishments on Murphy’s list: a new Head Start preschool center at the new light-rail Garrison Street Station, a Sustainable Neighborhoods Pilot program in the Glennon Heights neighborhood, the Seniors Mentoring Program, the opening of Ortho-Care Colorado Hospital on the St. Anthony Hospital campus, the pending July opening of St. A’s, and the progress of light-rail construction.